Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a type of talk therapy that has shown to be particularly effective for mood and anxiety disorders. Our psychologists are interested in how your thoughts, feelings and behaviours interact. If you can change the way you think, you can change the way you feel.

CBT works on the idea that for every situation we encounter we make a series of assumptions.  We do this to try to make sense of what is going on around us.  Based on these assumptions or thoughts we will feel a certain way, and our behaviours will be influenced (see example below).

Example: A friend has not shown up for a coffee date

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Assumptions are developed as a result of past experiences, core values, and beliefs we hold about ourselves, others, and the world in general.  It’s as if we all have a unique pair of lenses through which we view and make sense of the world.  Fortunately we are able to tweak the lenses so that our thinking becomes more realistic and balanced, and our feelings and behaviours more reasonable for each situation.  This is the cognitive part of CBT that refers to our cognitions or thoughts.

The behavioural part of CBT looks at a number of factors that might be maintaining the problems you are having. We can help you to identify more useful activities and positive lifestyle changes that will help pull you out of depression, or teach you the skills you need to be more assertive, or to physically relax. We can help you face the very things you fear, using a gradual exposure therapy approach.

In a CBT session individuals learn to take an active role in asking questions, monitoring their thoughts and behaviours, and practicing new strategies at home.

CBT helps individuals acquire the knowledge and tools necessary to overcome struggles and to lead more fulfilling lives.

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